Is My Resume Bad?

resume writing tipsYou have submitted your application to countless jobs, but can’t seem to land an interview, or even a return to your phone inquiries. Stepping back to assess the situation, it is impossible not to question yourself. Are you applying to jobs you aren’t qualified for? Or are there really so many job seekers out there that you simply can’t compete? If you are fairly convinced the answer to all these questions is “no”, it leaves only one other possibility lingering in your mind.

Is your resume bad?

Watch for Errors

One of the easiest ways to discredit yourself with a hiring manager is to have a resume littered with spelling and grammatical errors. Give your resume a thorough read through to see if there are any errors you can recognise on your own. Seek out a friend or former colleague who can then do the same for you. If at all possible, hire a professional to copy edit your resume as well. As competent as you may believe you are in the use of the English language, we are all more likely to miss our own errors when reviewing our work. This is why it is essential to have as many additional eyes on your resume as possible. Eliminating those errors now can keep a hiring manager from automatically assuming you are careless with your work.

Keep it Clean

The other important piece of resume construction is creating a format that is crisp, clean and easy to follow. This means avoiding a resume which is too long or has information jumbled in a haphazard manner. You also want to avoid printing your resume on bright paper or utilising a lot of graphics – anything which might appear to be unprofessional. Most hiring managers will typically only glance at the first page of your resume before deciding whether or not to read further. A poorly designed resume is much more likely to end up on the bottom of the applicant pile. This is another opportunity to ask for the opinions of friends and former colleagues. Allow others to read your resume, and then ask if they thought the important information was readily available or if they had a hard time determining your skills based on the current format. Take their advice to heart, and consider hiring a professional to help you design your resume if necessary.

Remain Relevant

While you may be proud of your work history dating back to your teens and the 20 different volunteer projects you are involved in each year, remember that your resume is an opportunity to present the skills and experience which make you the perfect fit for a specific career. If the two years you spent serving drinks at the local bar aren’t directly relevant to the types of positions you are looking for, and if you do have other experience which is more pertinent, consider cutting your bar duties out of your skill set and focusing instead on the ways you are a perfect fit for this job. Remember, however, that more and more hiring managers are conducting background checks these days, so under no circumstances should you make up a work history or experience in order to remain relevant.

Concise is Nice

If your resume requires a staple to hold it together, it is likely to long. Even with 40+ years of work history, condensing your skills and past positions down to those most relevant and recently occupied will prevent a hiring manager from becoming overwhelmed by the wealth of information in your resume and tossing it aside as a result. Use as few words as possible to describe your background and work history efficiently, consistently asking yourself “does that really need to be there?”

Visit Resumes Australia to learn more about how we can influence your career, from growing your networks to helping you develop clear goals and strategies. Alternatively, take advantage straight away of our services here.

Regards,

kylie hammond

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