Questions to Ask in a Job Interview


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There you are, sitting across from a hiring manager after what seemed to you to be a good first interview. You’re feeling strong and confident, but then – they ask the question you hadn’t prepared yourself for. Even though you probably should have, because it tends to be asked at the end of every interview.

“Do you have any questions for us?”

When preparing for interviews, applicants almost always forget to prepare for this one – they are so caught up in how to best present themselves, that they overlook the power of having well thought out questions to ask at the end.

Now you’re in a panic. You know that asking a question is important. It shows your genuine interest in this position and in knowing more about it and the company, and it gives the interviewer insight into where your head is. But asking the wrong question can also be fatal – for instance, now is not the time to ask about what benefits accompany the job offer. That’s putting the cart before the horse!

So what should you ask?

 

How have previous employees been most successful in this position?

This question shows you care about being successful, and that you want to know what tools others have utilized in the past to achieve that success. How can you be the best fit for the position, is basically what you are asking. You are showing the interviewer your commitment to being a valuable addition to the company, and to thriving in the role you are interviewing for.

 

If this wasn’t an interview, and you were just talking to a friend, what would you say you find most rewarding about working for this corporation?

Hiring managers like to know that you aren’t just desperately looking for any job – you want to work for their corporation in this role! With high turnover rates, finding employees who are passionate about the company mission can save organizations a lot of money, and asking the interviewer what they personally find most rewarding shows that you care about finding that fit as well.

 

What would you most like to see the person in this position accomplish in their first 90 days?

This is such an important question, and one most interviewers and interviewees fail to address – what are the expectations of you in those first 90 days? What could you do to blow your supervisors out of the water, and where should your priorities be placed? Asking this question again shows the hiring manager that you care about being successful in this role, and also that you are open to paying attention to assigned priorities, so long as they are willing to guide you in those early stages.

 

How would you describe the corporate culture here?

This is another one that focuses on the fit within an organization. It shows you care not just about finding a job, but about finding the right job in the right organization. Hiring managers are starting to place a much bigger emphasis on corporate culture and making hires that fit within that culture. So asking this question shows that you understand the value of that.

 

Is there anything about my qualifications that you think might be lacking?

While it may seem counterintuitive to potentially bring up areas where you may be lacking, asking this question allows you to address any concerns the hiring manager may have head on. It shows you aren’t afraid of exposing your areas of improvement, and that you are willing to take criticism and provide solutions for those perceived gaps. Finding out about those hesitations in an interview is so much more beneficial than hearing about them when you are being told someone else was given the job – so give the interviewer the chance to express any concerns they may have now, so that you can have the opportunity to ease their worries before those worries count you out for the job.

 

About Kylie Hammond
Executive Search Consultant, Head-Hunter, HR Consultant, Executive Career Coach, Expert Resume Writer & Executive Talent Agent.

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